Chicago Architecture Biennial Now Open in the Windy City

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Photography by Iwan Baan 2015 Courtesy of Chicago Architecture Biennial
Photography by Iwan Baan 2015 Courtesy of Chicago Architecture Biennial

Chicago has been a leading city in architectural innovation for centuries. This year’s inaugural Chicago Architecture Biennial, titled The State of the Art of Architecture, is a multiplatform event that invites the public to engage with architecture in new ways. The Biennial website notes that the exhibition “seeks to generate thinking about architecture and its implications for our times. It explores how creativity and imagination can radically transform lived experience as we negotiate urban, suburban, and rural contexts, as well as other places that have not yet been anticipated.”

We’ll be sharing new projects from the exhibition over the next few months. One of our initial favorites is the Lakefront Kiosk Competition, which called for designs to enhance the iconic Chicago lakefront. The winner of the competition is “Chicago Horizon” by Ultramoderne, a collaboration between architects Yasmin Vobis and Aaron Forrest and structural engineer Brett Schneider. With a goal to provide an excess of public space for Chicagoans and lakefront visitors, the kiosk uses Cross-Laminated Timber, a new carbon-negative engineered lumber product, in the largest dimensions commercially available, according to a statement from the architects. It will be on display at Millennium Park during the Chicago Architecture Biennial and permanently installed along Lake Michigan in Spring 2016.

Photo: Ultramoderne, Chicago Architecture Biennial
Photo: Ultramoderne, Chicago Architecture Biennial

Visionary ideas from more than 100 architects from around the world, including exhibitions, full-scale installations, and programs of events, are free and open to the public Oct. 3, 2015 to Jan. 3, 2016. Find specific hours and exhibit locations here. Get hyped up about the festival by watching this great trailer: